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Latest Posts

We recently posted a piece in which Harvard PCP chapter member, Andreas Mitchell, announced an upcoming town hall on family medicine at Harvard. The event took place last month, and here's how it went.

By Rachael Rosales

In my conversations leading up to the Center for Primary Care’s family medicine town hall, I discovered that most faculty and students already acknowledge family medicine's importance to clinical care. Even for those who didn’t know that 40 percent of primary care visits in the United States are made to family physicians or that family physicians are the leaders of such national initiatives as TransforMed and Family Medicine for America’s Health, they intuitively understood family physicians’ critical role in primary care and community medicine. Yet Harvard maintains its status as one of only four LCME-accredited medical schools without a family medicine clerkship. Learning this, the people I spoke to were either astonished or shrugged it off, saying, "It'll happen eventually."

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Posted by Sonya Collins on Dec 18, 2014 10:13 AM EST
The 2014 Hotspotting Mini-Grant Project gives health professions students an unprecedented hands-on opportunity to practice an innovative model of care delivery called hotspotting. Hotspotters identify health care super-utilizers --  people who are admitted to the hospital multiple times a year, frequently for avoidable complications of chronic conditions, and who often have social barriers to adhering to their care plan. The hotspotters proactively bring additional attention, follow-up, resources and care to these patients in their homes and communities to help keep them out of the hospital. Student hotspotters will share their experiences here twice a month. This is the final post in the series “Notes from the Hotspotters.”

By Jake Quinton

Madeline – a nursing student and hotspotting teammate – and I got back in the car after our third home visit with “R,” a woman whose complications from diabetes have landed her in the hospital every one to two weeks for the past two years. R is so well-mannered that she shows concern over how much homework we’re able to get done while we’re working with her. As we drive, I'm struck by the discrepancy between R’s health challenges and her resources. 

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Posted by Sonya Collins on Dec 16, 2014 11:13 AM EST
In today's blog post, a University of Minnesota chapter co-chair tells us about their inspiring annual kickoff event, which focused this year on Barbara Starfield's four c's of primary care -- and added a fifth.

By Ben Rosenstein

The Minnesota Chapter of Primary Care Progress held its annual kickoff this month, inviting students of the University of Minnesota health professional schools to participate and learn about what Primary Care Progress has to offer. A variety of professions were represented with students from the schools of medicine, nursing, pharmacy, public health, dietetics, and medical administration all joining in an evening that celebrated primary care. They shared stories and formed new relationships while enjoying pizza and locally donated beer. Then Dr. Shailendra Prasad, a family physician in Minneapolis, spoke about the future of primary care. He reminded us about Barbara Starfield’s 4 C’s of primary care: accessible contact, coordination, comprehensiveness, and continuity. Dr. Prasad described the ability to provide continuity as a superpower that primary care providers have. 

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Posted by Sonya Collins on Dec 11, 2014 11:27 AM EST
Today on the blog, read about students who used Google Docs to create a virtual focus group where health professions students from all over the country can share their perspectives on primary care. Then, follow this link to share your perspective, too.

By Alex Kazberouk

My most interesting conversations as a medical student often happen spontaneously – at lunches, between classes and clinic, or on hospital shuttle rides. While classmates talk about school, TV shows, or restaurants to explore in Boston, we also share our perspectives on primary care, the current medical system, and hopes and fears for our future. Unfortunately, outside of academic publications or conferences, there are few venues to share these views with the broader medical community, and there are not enough opportunities to hear from students from different professional schools or from outside of Boston either. Yet there is seemingly infinite media and technology to facilitate such exchanges.

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Posted by Sonya Collins on Dec 9, 2014 9:17 AM EST
Members of New Jersey Medical School's PCP chapter brought family physician innovator Pamela Wible to their school to talk about her ideal clinic model that pushes the boundaries of bureaucracy and convention.

By Rahul Vasireddy

This year the New Jersey Medical School Primary Care Progress chapter is highlighting the efforts of “primary care rock stars” – practitioners who are pushing the boundaries of bureaucracy and of practice models that do not satisfy the needs of patients and practitioners. In this vein, we decided to host Dr. Pamela Wible, a family physician from Eugene, Oregon. She practices medicine through the “ideal clinic” care model. This model of care is based on the idea that drastically lowering overhead costs will allow physicians to spend meaningful time with patients, thus creating a space to address the underlying, often-undiscussed issues at the root of health problems. 

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Posted by Sonya Collins on Dec 4, 2014 7:52 AM EST
The 2014 Hotspotting Mini-Grant Project gives health professional students an unprecedented hands-on opportunity to practice an innovative model of care delivery called hotspotting. Hotspotters identify health care super-utilizers --  people who are admitted to the hospital multiple times a year, frequently for avoidable complications of chronic conditions, and who often have social barriers to adhering to their care plan. The hotspotters proactively bring additional attention, follow-up, resources and care to these patients in their homes and communities to help keep them out of the hospital. Student hotspotters will share their experiences here twice a month for the rest of this year in “Notes from the Hotspotters.”

By Rebecca Bausinger

Heading into Section 8 housing – also known as “the projects” – our hotspotting team was not sure what to expect. Our task ahead was daunting — we had yet to enroll any of our four required patients. This would be my first home health experience. For a health care provider, going into a patient’s home can be nerve-racking if you are not used to it. I was glad to have two of my teammates by my side. 

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Posted by Sonya Collins on Dec 2, 2014 7:51 AM EST
Today on the blog, we're introducing PCP's new Clinical Innovation Network (CIN) and its new blog Innovation in PracticeThis new blog is dedicated specifically to sharing clinical innovation with trainees. From time to time, like today, we'll run those blog posts here on Progress Notes, too. But if you don't want to miss a thing, make sure you follow them both.

By Peter Meyers

Countless articles, news stories and blog posts – including many right here – describe current primary care providers, and physicians in particular, as dissatisfied with their careers. These stories usually note that the physicians have become exactly the type of doctor they never thought they’d be: disengaged, disinterested, callous, and paternalistic. And, almost universally, the physicians blame a system that emphasizes short visits and long hours and breeds burnout. Those burned-out providers essentially have three choices: Continue to be miserable; change professions; or find innovative ways to work around or eliminate the aspects of their work that make it unbearable. 

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Posted by Sonya Collins on Nov 25, 2014 10:50 AM EST
Members of PCP's University of Rochester chapter value interprofessional collaboration and respect. Every year they host a unique event that fosters relationship-building among medical and nursing students. Here, one of their chapter leaders tells us how it went.

By Julia Cooper

One recent rainy evening, University of Rochester students gathered in a classroom at the School of Nursing for our Primary Care Progress chapter’s Meet-and-Eat event. This annual dinner brings together medical and nursing students to socialize, share stories and enjoy sandwiches from our favorite family-owned restaurant. We love the Meet-and-Eat because our discussions always generate new topics for workshops and talks, but more importantly, because it reminds us that however isolated we may feel, our two schools are only a few steps apart.

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Posted by Sonya Collins on Nov 20, 2014 1:51 PM EST
The 2014 Hotspotting Mini-Grant Project gives health professional students an unprecedented hands-on opportunity to practice an innovative model of care delivery called hotspotting. Hotspotters identify health care super-utilizers --  people who are admitted to the hospital multiple times a year, frequently for avoidable complications of chronic conditions, and who often have social barriers to adhering to their care plan. The hotspotters proactively bring additional attention, follow-up, resources and care to these patients in their homes and communities to help keep them out of the hospital. Student hotspotters will share their experiences here twice a month for the rest of this year in “Notes from the Hotspotters.”

By Eliza Hutchinson

“There was one time when I wasn’t here for seven months in a row,” “Pam” told me.
 
I sat with Pam in her third floor hospital room – the floor on which she always stays when admitted to the inpatient medicine service – as nurses, doctors, and janitors poked their heads in the door to say friendly hellos and “Nice to see you again, Pam!” A dining facility staff member entered with a tray, letting Pam know, “I brought you the usual, Pam. I missed you!” Pam smiled and joked with the parade of staff members as I pondered this oddly happy reunion. 

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Posted by Sonya Collins on Nov 18, 2014 12:18 PM EST
Initially daunted by the complexity of her first primary care patient, this resident went on to build a relationship with him that reaffirmed her decision to practice primary care.

By Eunice Yu, M.D.

When I started my internal medicine residency, I was pretty sure I was going to rock this primary care thing. I knew the drugs for hypertension, the guidelines for diabetes management, and depression management seemed like nothing more than an algorithm. I felt buoyed by familiarity as I looked at the problem list for my first primary care patient: basically diabetes, hypertension, and depression.
 
As I opened the exam room door that early July day, I smelled the urine from my patient’s catheter before I even saw him. He sat in a motorized wheelchair, one leg amputated, and he didn’t make eye contact.

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Posted by Sonya Collins on Nov 13, 2014 10:06 AM EST
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Most Recent Comments

Thanks for reporting on this Rachael. You help us feel like we were right there in the room, capturing the energy and d...
A colleague at Honoring Choices Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN) forwarded your blog entry to my attention. Your addit...
Jake! I love this post for many different reasons. Firstly, I love the fact that you're bringing other frameworks fo...
Nice post, Ben! I like the idea of the 5th "c". I wonder if the rates of interest in primary care would increase if every...
It's so important to acknowledge the difficulty primary care physicians have in this policy environment and still...

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